FACTBOX-Highlights of Reuters/Ipsos U.S. poll

Aug 24 (BestGrowthStock) – Reuters conducted a poll of U.S. voters
in mid-August on American political issues, President Barack
Obama’s approval rating and November’s congressional
elections.

Here are the main findings:

OBAMA’S RATING FALLS FURTHER

* For the first time, most people said they disapprove of
Obama’s performance as president. Some 52 percent of those
surveyed said they strongly disapprove, somewhat disapprove or
lean towards disapproving of his job performance.

* Only 45 percent gave Obama a positive approval rating, a
new low.

* Obama’s approval rating is down from 50 percent in
January and 69 percent when he took office in January 2009. His
approval and disapproval ratings both stood at 48 percent last
month.

UNEMPLOYMENT A TOP CONCERN

* Unemployment topped the economic concerns of those
surveyed.

* Some 92 percent said they were concerned by the country’s
9.5 percent jobless rate, with 72 percent saying they were
“very” concerned about unemployment.

* Other top concerns include the financial industry (88
percent), the budget deficit and government spending (87
percent each), the value of the dollar (85 percent) and taxes
(84 percent).

* The value of investments (79 percent) and housing prices
(77 percent) rounded out the list.

* Sixty-seven percent said they were not just concerned but
“very” concerned about government spending.

WASHINGTON IS BROKEN

* Most of those surveyed see Washington as dysfunctional,
with more blaming Republicans than Obama’s Democrats.

* Some 78 percent agreed that Washington no longer works
effectively.

* 36 percent of those said Republicans were more to blame,
while 28 percent said Democrats were at fault. Some 28 percent
said both parties were to blame.

CONFLICTED ON TAX CUTS

* Americans are split on the question of whether to extend
soon-to-expire tax cuts.

* Some 49 percent say the tax cuts should be extended for
all income brackets, while 31 percent say those who earn more
than $200,000 a year should see their tax rates rise back to
rates that were in place in the 1990s, as Obama has argued.
Only 15 percent say the tax cuts should expire for all
Americans.

* Despite widespread support for continued low tax rates,
most of those surveyed said it was a higher priority to lower
the budget deficit.

* Fifty-four percent said it was more important to reduce
the budget deficit, while 43 percent said it was more important
to lower taxes for all Americans.

PARTIES TIED AHEAD OF NOVEMBER ELECTIONS

* Neither party holds a substantial edge as voters look
ahead to the Nov. 2 congressional elections.

* Some 45 percent said they plan to vote for the Democratic
candidate in their district, while 43 percent said they would
vote for the Republican. That is within the survey’s margin of
error.

* Among registered voters, Republicans held an advantage of
one percentage point, also within the margin of error.

* Democrats’ advantage among all of those surveyed has
shrunk from 10 percentage points in February’s poll.

* Democrats still retained an edge on party affiliation.
Some 48 percent of those surveyed said agreed more with
Democrats, while 40 percent said they leaned toward Republicans
and 12 percent considered themselves independents.

MOST STILL THINK COUNTRY ON WRONG TRACK

* 62 percent said they thought the country was on the wrong
track, roughly in line with levels in previous surveys.

The poll, conducted between August 19 and 22, surveyed
1,063 adults aged 18 and older across the United States. Some
950 of those surveyed were registered voters. The survey is
considered to be accurate within three percentage points.

Full results can be found at
http://www.ipsos-na.com/news-polls/reuters-polls/
(Reporting by Andy Sullivan, editing by Anthony Boadle)

FACTBOX-Highlights of Reuters/Ipsos U.S. poll