UPDATE 2-Obama campaigning, ties Republicans to big business

* Obama sees 800,000 new jobs from clean energy plans

* Charges Republicans resist efforts to help workers

* Republicans say “no” votes on initiatives justified

* LA fundraiser at home of “West Wing” producer
(Adds comment from Los Angeles event)

By Patricia Zengerle

LOS ANGELES, Aug 16 (BestGrowthStock) – President Barack Obama
painted Republicans as obstructionist allies of corporate
America on Monday as he crossed the United States campaigning
for his fellow Democrats fighting to keep control of the U.S.
Congress and for state governorships in November’s elections.

At a battery plant in Wisconsin Obama sought to convince
voters he can ease high unemployment and has a plan to fix a
slowing economy in which fears have grown of a double-dip
recession.

He accused Republicans of trying to turn back the clock by
resisting his administration’s efforts to bolster the sagging
economy.

“They said ‘no’ to small business tax cuts, ‘no’ to
rebuilding infrastructure, ‘no’ to clean energy projects. They
even voted against getting rid of tax breaks for shipping jobs
overseas,” Obama said.

His plans to revive U.S. manufacturing include offering
economic incentives to domestic producers of clean-energy
products.

“We expect our commitment to clean energy to lead to more
than 800,000 jobs by 2012,” he told a small crowd at ZBB Energy
Corp, a maker of high-tech batteries.

Obama’s trip will take him to Wisconsin, California,
Washington, Ohio and Florida in three days for a series of
fundraisers for Democrats running in the Nov. 2 elections.

In Milwaukee, Obama also spoke at a luncheon event that
raised more than $325,000 for Mayor Tom Barrett, who is running
to be the next governor of Wisconsin. He then flew to Los
Angeles for a fundraiser for Democratic congressional
candidates at the home of John Wells, producer of television
shows including “The West Wing.”

A Democratic party official said that event brought in $1
million.

REPUBLICANS SAY NO VOTES JUSTIFIED

In Milwaukee Obama said Republicans who objected to his
healthcare overhaul law were siding with insurance companies
who seek to deny coverage to sick patients.

He also charged that Republicans who objected to financial
regulatory reform backed Wall Street firms that resist
regulation despite their role in the financial crash that
helped cause the recession.

Obama, who has struggled to win over some corporate leaders
who see him as anti-business, also blasted a congressman who
apologized to BP Plc over the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

“That’s the choice in this election. On issue after issue,
the Republicans in Congress have sided with corporate special
interests over middle-class families,” he said.

The Democrats’ chances in November are complicated by
Obama’s approval ratings — which hover in the mid- to lower-40
percent range — and fears that the economy may slip back into
recession. Some Democratic candidates have declined to attend
events with the president.

Republicans had good reasons for their opposition to
Obama’s programs, which raised the deficit, increased taxes
and, in the case of financial reform, will hurt small
businesses, said a spokesman for Senate Republican leader Mitch
McConnell.

A sharp widening in the U.S. trade deficit forced
economists to revise down estimates for second-quarter growth,
indicating the slowdown has come more quickly than pessimists
expected. For more, please see: [ID:nN11217117]

Steadfast weakness in housing and a stubbornly high
unemployment rate of 9.5 percent were among factors that led
the U.S. Federal Reserve last week to offer more monetary
stimulus to the economy.

In Los Angeles, Obama told the Hollywood crowd his
administration had delivered “the most progressive legislative
agenda… not just in one generation, maybe two, maybe three.”
And he urged them to support Democratic members of Congress,
who have experienced “just instant, non-stop opposition on
everything” from Republicans.

(Editing by Chris Wilson and Sandra Maler)

UPDATE 2-Obama campaigning, ties Republicans to big business